Recently, having had certain aspects of who I am come up, I’ve looked at some reasons I am the way I am. Growing up a Jehovah’s Witness, sometimes, it’s easy to point out all the things wrong with it. It wasn’t just a matter of going to church on Sundays; it was a complete lifestyle.

For starters, we went to the Kingdom Hall a minimum of two days a week. Add to that the days we met up to go preaching from house to house, and we found ourselves at the Kingdom Hall up to 4 days a week. I’ve written before about how being a witness and being in the “truth” meant not associating with “worldly people” beyond what was necessary.

This meant, no birthday parties, no listening to most music because they glorified the things in the world. No films that were ratedabove PG 13, and even then, you needed. Another thing we didn’t take part in was the political and social issues of the day. Being no part of the world meant advocating for God’s Kingdom to solve mankind’s problems. If you wanted an end to racial, social and economic injustices, then advocate even harder for God’s kingdom to come.

I’ve always felt somewhat “behind” in life. Not hip to most pop culture references, politically and socially ambivalent. I’ve been working overtime to remedy that in recent years with surprising realizations about my passion regarding social, economic and racial issues and there’s been growing pains.

Growing up with a certain set of values have irrevocably shaped who I am today. Many of what I’d consider my positive traits are because of those values. My journey in self-discovery has shown me that while there may always be a certain wish that I grew up differently with access to more options and exposure, there is always some good to be foundin who we are right now.

Forgiveness comes easy to me and I am very grateful for that. I attribute it to the scripture at 1 Corinthians 6:7 that asks us to let ourselves be wrongedrather than pursue a lawsuit against a fellow member of the congregation. There is something to be saidabout needing to stand up for yourself and all that, but the sentiment behind the scripture is to let things go if we can especially when it involves someone we love remembering that we are all flawed and will make mistakes.

Another quality inseparable from who I am is the ability to be content no matter what. The scripture says keep a simple eye because when the eye is simple, the whole body is simple. Being taught to keep a simple eye may have meant a lack of ambition but more than anything else, it has meant being satisfied with my current situation even while seeking ways to make more money or whatever else. Finding joy in the simple pleasures, accepting that the future and certain things in the present are beyond our abilities and out of our control.

These lessons apply in all situations because we can only accomplish anything in the NOW. Eckhart Tolle talks about this in The Power of Now extensively. Being able to accept that any decision we will ever make will only ever happen in the NOW helps us let go of things outside our control. This comes easier to me than most things so here I am passing it on as a reminder especially if it’s something hard for you to remember and/or practice.

Be it weight loss, overcoming trauma, dealing with anxiety or depression, working to live with the truth that the now is all we will ever have, will pay great dividends. Another scripture that comes to mind regarding that is at Luke 12:26, 26 where Jesus asks his disciples “Who of you by being anxious can add a cubit to his life span? If, therefore, you cannot do such a small thing, why be anxious about the remaining things?”

While I may no longer identify as a Christian (or anything right now), there are many lessons to be learnedfrom growing up as one. It is a good reminder for me to remember and honor where I come from even if I’m still healing from the damage that arose from it.

With love,

Christabel

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